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Tuesday, February 8, 2011

Can anyone explain this?


I'm no science-whiz, but let me take a shot at it. When the water bottle is undisturbed, still from the factory, the oxygen is totally separated from the water at the top of the bottle. The near instant freezing has something to do with breaking the bonded water molecules and re-introducing the oxygen (in it's gaseous form) back into the water. I don't know if this is actually correct, it's just a guess.

...

Ok, after reading the video comments, it seems I was right. Cool (no pun intended).

27 comments:

  1. That's pretty cool. I wonder why it doesn't freeze though when it's just out there undisturbed. Does the water actually need direct contact with the cold environment?

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  2. Wow, that's crazy. The marvels of science, I guess.

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  3. But how???

    I really want to know why that happens. Probably some kind of reaction of the molecules in it.

    My theory is a bit "stupid" (I'm not good at chemistry).
    We all know that warm water freeze up faster than cold water. So maybe a shake is enough kinetic energy make the water warm (fast moving molecules) which would be enough to freeze (which are slow moving molecules).

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  4. The furthest I advanced in Science was "Physical". Pathetic, I know. Interesting video nonetheless.

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  5. weird. I wonder why Ive never heard about this before.

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  6. I love stuff like this. Just proves science doesn't have to be boring. :P

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  7. that's really awesome. the first comment on youtube should answer your question

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  8. Mind=blown. I love strange science like this.

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  9. WOAH.. what... the... damn I wish I lived somewhere that cold JUST to be able to do that! >:3

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  10. This is fucking cool. I'm gonna try it.

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  11. I remember they did something like this involving beer on mythbusters not to long ago. Something to do with the bubbles forming

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  12. That's really cool! So is this, just "naturally" super chilled then?

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  13. supercooling.

    I like your blog, I'll be following :)

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  14. This is unbelievable. Following

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  15. It's obvious! You have to be canadian to get this work!

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  16. It's not a fake... but I'm also curious about this.

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  17. hmmm im no definitely not a science person.. i have no idea how this works

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  18. Awesome video, keep posting good stuff!

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  19. I put a water bottle in the freezer at work every day, so I can do this. It's such a neat trick.

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  20. The reason for the freezing is caused by supercooling in which a liquid is rapidly cooled and the water molecules do not have enough time to rearrange themselves around a central point or seed crystal and rearrange themselves into a solid, lattice formation around this central point so the water reaches below freezing temperatures and remains a liquid. Once the bottle is shaken and hit, it gives the water molecules enough kinetic energy to rearrange themselves around the point of impact into the solid lattice formation and thus turning into a solid. This explains why the water began freezing where the dude hit the bottle. He doesnt have to turn it upside down. He just has to hit the bottle to initiate it.

    Physical chemist BTW

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  21. i know this from having some beerbottles in the freezer, but never could explain it to myself.

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  22. Wow, amazing. Definitely going to try this!

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  23. Wow awesome. Your explanation sounds right.

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